The use of elevated diction, imagery, plays on words, and even an irregular rhyme scheme deepens the meanings of the poems as they relate to people in the Renaissance era and even today. It’s a poem about ageing, and about the benefits of having children – continuing the argument begun in the previous sonnet. Shakespeare - A nalysis of Sonnet 2 : In Sonnet 2, Shakespeare stresses to his lover that beauty will not last, and that it is selfish and foolish for anyone not to prepare for the loss of beauty and youth by having a child to carry on unsurpassed beauty. In summary, Sonnet 22 sees Shakespeare declaring that as long as the Youth remains young, so does he, the poet, too. The poet attempts to scare the young man into marrying and having children by showing him his future. © 2020 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. Contrasts exist within this sonnet that add to the overall tone and argument. Shakespeare varied the metric rhythm in certain lines to strengthen meaning and contrast between soft and hard emphasis. The sonnet's first four lines relate all of these important themes. The structure of the sonnet is 4-4-4-2, although there is a change of emphasis and tone after the 8th line which means that the sonnet has a distinguishable octave and sestet. It's a convincing line of persuasion. However this changes after a number of sonnets. ‘When forty winters shall besiege thy brow’ by William Shakespeare addresses the need to have children as a way of guaranteeing one’s legacy and beauty. Proving, by his beauty, that he succeeds you as an heir to your beauty. Sonnet 2 Analysis The sonnets by Shakespeare convince a young, handsome friend of Shakespeare’s to have children to forever keep his beauty alive. In this sonnet, the poet is giving almost fatherly advice to the fair youth. When forty winters have attacked your brow and wrinkled your beautiful skin, the pride and impressiveness of your youth, so much admired by everyone now, will have become a worthless, tattered weed. Few collections of poems intrigue, challenge, tantalize, and reward us as do Shakespeare’s Sonnets, all written in the English sonnet form. They're not. The sequence is logical. It shows the poet’s intense desire to devote self wholeheartedly to God, but at the same time it shows the painful struggle that goes on in his mind between this desire and the temptation that sin offers. Sonnet 2 Analysis The sonnets by Shakespeare convince a young, handsome friend of Shakespeare’s to have children to forever keep his beauty alive. The poet predicts that by the time the youth turns forty years old, he will have "deep-sunken eyes," and the shame he will feel for not having children will be an "all-eating" emotion, which recalls the phrases "Feed'st thy light's flame" and "this glutton be" from Sonnet 1. Below is Sonnet 2, and a few words of summary and analysis Shakespeare's Sonnet 2 is the second procreation sonnet. Sonnet 2 modern English explanation. Value is related to phrases words such as - small worth held, treasure (which may also have sexual associations), thriftless praise. Actors and dramatists could deliver this sonnet with a touch of anger, with a quiet persuasiveness, with grim determination. It shows the poet’s intense desire to devote self wholeheartedly to God, but at the same time it shows the painful struggle that goes on in his mind between this desire and the temptation that sin offers. The sonnets by Shakespeare convince a young, handsome friend of. In Sonnet 2 Shakespeare continues the theme of procreation explaining to man the importance and beauty of his life and how he shouldn’t waste it. Many times, in Shakespeare, after the first half hour I have almost given up in despair: "This really is it. Both were patrons of Shakespeare. Sonnet 2 Analysis. Time again is the great enemy, besieging the youth's brow, digging trenches — wrinkles — in his face, and ravaging his good looks. The poet does not call the act of love "increase," as he did in Sonnet 1, but "use," meaning investment, the opposite of "niggarding" from Sonnet 1. For example, the first quatrain starts off in conventional manner, with iambic feet, da-DUM da-DUM the beat, but soon changes: When for / ty win / ters shall / besiege / thy brow (2 iambs + pyrrhic + 2 iambs), And dig / deep tren / ches in / thy beau / ty's field, (iamb + spondee + pyrrhic + 2 iambs), Thy youth's / proud liv / ery, / so gazed / on now, (iamb + spondee + pyrrhic + 2 iambs), Will be / a tott / ered weed / of small / worth held. Summary. The use of a conceit, an Elizabethan poetic technique using metaphor, is clear. This was the age of plague, diseases, poverty and violent end, hence the rather urgent pleas for the fair youth to commit to fatherhood, or forever be shamed. The poet writes that while the beloved’s repentance and shame do not rectify the damage done, the beloved’s tears … (2 iambs+ trochee+ 2 iambs). The second quatrain piles on the potential pain for the subject, the speaker putting forward a future scenario where the subject is questioned about his former beauty, his former (hidden) treasure and sparkling lusty energy. Shakespeare borrowed these classic metaphors - 'he ploughs the brow with furrows' and 'furrows which may plough your body' - from the ancient Roman writers Virgil and Ovid. That stressed spondaic emphasis on dig deep trenches really hits home, and the imagery of a worthless weed, planted in an alliterative fourth line, is striking. It's quite plain to see that the regular, steady iambic pentameter is interspersed with unstressed pyrrhics and double stressed spondees, bringing stark contrast. Agricultural associations in the words - field, tattered weed. They support the idea that Shakespeare was a poet for all and the sonnets are universal in nature, not based on his sexuality, more on his humanity. Alliterative phrases - besiege thy brow....dig deep...weed, of small worth...much more....Shall sum...make my....blood warm when. Analysis. When forty winters shall besiege thy brow, And dig deep trenches in thy beauty's field, Thy youth's proud livery so gazed on now, Will be a tattered weed of small worth held: “Forty winters” refers to a long time passing. Search all of SparkNotes Search. Suggestions Use up and down arrows to review and enter to select. Note the additional use of agricultural metaphor too, with terms such as field and weed. When forty winters shall besiege thy brow, besiege = lay siege to. Lacking absolute proof, all we have are the sonnets themselves and they are each a glimpse into the heart and mind of a master craftsman taking his art to another level, focusing on beauty, love, time and inevitable change. Shakespeare makes use of several poetic techniques in Sonnet 2: ‘When forty winters shall besiege thy brow’. Few collections of poems intrigue, challenge, tantalize, and reward us as do Shakespeare’s Sonnets, all written in the English sonnet form. A "thriftless" victim of time, he is symbolized by "winters" rather than by years. Summary and Analysis. Beauty is conceived of as a treasure that decays unless, through love, its natural increase — marrying and having children — is made possible. An in-depth analysis of William Shakespeare's second Sonnet This time, however, the youth's narcissism is both physical and emotional. However this changes after a number of sonnets. Tatter'd Weed: Having ragged garments Thriftless: Careless in handeling money; wasteful, or He warns him that even though he is handsome now, his good looks just won't last. In Sonnet 3 Shakespeare … Shakespeare Sonnet 3, Look in thy glass and tell the face thou viewest. The speaker addresses the Fair Youth, informing him that in short order he’s going to lose his beauty and his face is going to look like a ploughed field. Development of the Sonnet Form: Sonnets in Context; Shakespeare Sonnets Analysis; Publishing The Sonnets; Shakespeare Love Sonnets; Sonnet 1: From Fairest Creatures We Desire Increase; Sonnet 2: When Forty Winters Shall Besiege Thy Brow; Sonnet 3: Look In Thy Glass, And Tell The Face Thous Viewest; Sonnet 4: Unthrifty Loveliness, Why Dost Thou Spend Sonnet 2 Analysis Symbols, Imagery, Wordplay Sonnet 2 opens with a metaphor that compares the way time wears away a person's face to the way an army attacks a castle. When forty winters shall beseige thy brow, And dig deep trenches in thy beauty's field, Thy youth's proud livery, so gazed on now, Will be a tatter'd weed, of small worth held: Then being ask'd where all thy beauty lies, Where all the treasure of thy lusty days, To say, within thine own deep-sunken eyes, Were an all-eating shame and thriftless praise. Synopsis: The poet defends his love of a mistress who does not meet the conventional standard of beauty by claiming that her dark eyes and hair (and, perhaps, dark skin) are the new standard. Note the association between so gazed on now and deep-sunken eyes connecting quatrain to quatrain in extreme contrast. (3 iambs + pyrrhic + spondee). Removing #book# Forty winters … 13. The first quatrain has a noticeable sentence structure because the subject isn't introduced until line 3 and the verb delayed until line 4, so building up a powerful effect - from inevitable aging (forty winters) to proud youth. Shakespeare stresses that this beauty will not last, and that it is selfish and foolish for him not to prepare for the loss of his beauty and youth. Analysis of Sonnet 2. There is a tone of quiet desperation in this sonnet, the speaker imploring the young man or woman to stop delaying, stop being so vain, and think about future prospects for their beauty. The speaker pleas on behalf of common sense and logic and aims directly for the conscience of the subject - the presumed fair youth - hoping to persuade him to have children and thus preserve his beauty. Shakespeare's Sonnets essays are academic essays for citation. These include, but are not limited to, alliteration and metaphor. (pyrrhic + spondee + 3 iambs), How much / more praise / deserved / thy beau / ty's use, (iamb + spondee + 3 iambs), If thou / couldst ans / wer, "This / fair child / of mine (iamb + spondee + 3 iambs), Proving / his beau / ty by / success / ion thine. Shakespeare stresses that this beauty will not last, and that it is selfish and foolish for him not to prepare for the loss of his beauty and youth. Many believe Shakespeare’s sonnets are addressed to two different people he may have known. The only thing the young man will have to look back on is his self-absorbed "lusty days," empty because he created nothing — namely, no children. The phrase represents forty years that have passed. Note that this sonnet does not mention the gender of the addressee, although it is accepted among critics that it is meant for the ears and eyes of the fair youth. Shakespeare stresses that this beauty will not last, and that it is selfish and foolish for him not to prepare for the loss of his beauty and youth. Vocabulary: Beseige: Livery: A distinctive uniform worn by the male servants of a household; also used as a metaphor for the beauty of a young man that Shakespeare is describing. When the youth is forty years old, he will be nothing but a "tottered weed" (meaning tattered garment), "of small worth held" because he will be alone and childless. Specifically, this is a siege conceit involving terms like besiege, livery, trenches. In this sonnet the sun is again overtaken by clouds, but now the sun/beloved is accused of having betrayed the poet by promising what is not delivered. About “Sonnet 2” The theme of this Sonnet continues the urging to procreation found in Sonnet 1. The poet's argument that the young man is actually hurting himself by not procreating is present in this sonnet as it was in the preceding one. Fourteen lines split into three quatrains and a concluding couplet. Sonnet #2 does have lines of pure iambic pentameter but Shakespeare varied the feet in several lines ( he used pyrrhic, trochaic and spondaic feet), which alters the rhythms, brings contrast and added interest for the reader. If they were they would tend to plod along to a hidden robotic metronome and never veer off course. the desired result. Using figurative language, the metaphor of field and livery, the conceit of warfare, Shakespeare sets the opening scene by suggesting that the subject's good looks won't be worth a tattered weed in forty years time. Sonnet 116: ‘Let me not to the marriage of true minds’, which is easily one of the most recognised of his poetry, particularly the first several lines.In total, it is believed that Shakespeare wrote 154 sonnets, in addition to the thirty-seven plays that are also attributed to him. The pyrrhics provide what has been called a softer base out of which spring the spondees and to a lesser extent the iambs. and any corresponding bookmarks? It's written in the form of an argument, as if the speaker is using logic to convince the subject of a thesis. Proving his beauty by succession thine! There are certain words related to war fare and the battlefield - besiege, deep trenches, livery. Sonnet 22 appears shortly after the early group of poems which urged the young man to have a child, and is one of the first sonnets to focus upon the speaker’s feelings. Each quatrain is a single sentence. Summary of Sonnet 2. Being forty years old in Shakespeare’s time would likely have been considered to be a “good old age”, so when forty winters had passed, you would have been considered old. (trochee + iamb + pyrrhic + 2 iambs), And see / thy blood / warm when / thou feel'st / it cold. But if he has a child, then …. 2. Just think about: In truth, no specific evidence identifies any person as the young man in these seventeen sonnets. Sonnet 2 uses metaphor and antithetical elements to argue the case for procreation. Shakespeare’s to have children to forever keep his beauty alive. Analysis This is Sonnet II of Donne’s “Holy Sonnets”. Sonnet 2: Analysis. proving also has the meaning of 'testing, trying out' which may be relevant here. This barrenness of old age is symbolized in the sonnet's last line, "And see thy blood warm when thou feel'st it cold," and contrasts to the previous sonnet's spring imagery. Sonnet 2. Sonnet Analysis Shakespeare Sonnet 2, When forty winters shall besiege thy brow. bookmarked pages associated with this title. "Proud livery" in line 3, here meaning well-tailored clothing, contrasts to "tottered weed" as the clothes of a nobleman's servant contrast to the rags of a beggar; the phrase also refers to the youth's outward beauty, which time devours. William Shakespeare left no letter, no manuscript, no clues as to who this individual might have been. Mac.II.3.2-3. But if he has a child, then …. Shakespeare's Sonnets essays are academic essays for citation. This process naturally throws up points that need some kind of note, like the Muscovite. Sonnet 2. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans. Sonnet 22 appears shortly after the early group of poems which urged the young man to have a child, and is one of the first sonnets to focus upon the speaker’s feelings. Mystery surrounds the actual historical name of this 'fair youth' but it seems likely that the sonnets were written to persuade either William Herbert, 3rd earl of Pembroke, or Henry Wriothesley, 3rd earl of Southampton, to marry and have children. A critical reading of a Shakespeare sonnet. Introduction and Text of Sonnet 2: "When forty winters shall besiege thy brow" In the second marriage sonnet from the Shakespeare 154-sonnet sequence, the speaker continues to implore the young man to take a wife and produce offspring.He cautions the young lad to act before he begins to age and lose his youth, vitality, and beauty. And don't be fooled by those who claim that Shakespeare's sonnets are all written in 100% iambic pentameter. Summary. Shakespeare begins his sonnets by introducing four of his most important themes — immortality, time, procreation, and selfishness — which are interrelated in this first sonnet both thematically and through the use of images associated with business or commerce. In line 8, he speaks of "thriftless praise," or unprofitable praise — the term "thrift" during Shakespeare's lifetime had various meanings, including profit and increase, which also recalls Sonnet 1. Shakespeare’s Sonnet 3: Look In Thy Glass, And Tell The Face Thou Viewest is elegantly written and noted for its simplicity and efficacy. Further analysis of these two poems indicates Donne’s personal feelings towards God. All rights reserved. Vocabulary: Beseige: Livery: A distinctive uniform worn by the male servants of a household; also used as a metaphor for the beauty of a young man that Shakespeare is describing. Introduction and Text of Sonnet 2: "When forty winters shall besiege thy brow" In the second marriage sonnet from the Shakespeare 154-sonnet sequence, the speaker continues to implore the young man to take a wife and produce offspring.He cautions the young lad to act before he begins to age and lose his youth, vitality, and beauty. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Shakespeare’s Sonnets and what it means. He says that his ‘glass’ (i.e. Shakespeare starts out by trying to scare this young man a little bit, to make him think about what it will be like to be old. However this changes after a number of sonnets. CliffsNotes study guides are written by real teachers and professors, so no matter what you're studying, CliffsNotes can ease your homework headaches and help you score high on exams. It is a procreation sonnet within the Fair Youth sequence. SONNET 2. And praise is mentioned twice. A term from warfare. Are you sure you want to remove #bookConfirmation# Sonnet 2 Summary. A summary of Part X (Section9) in William Shakespeare's Shakespeare’s Sonnets. Sonnet #2 is a typical Shakespearean sonnet, 14 lines long, made up of three quatrains and a final couplet with the 'turn' or conclusion. However this changes after a number of sonnets. The speaker pleas on behalf of common sense and logic and aims directly for the conscience of the subject - the presumed fair youth - hoping to persuade him to have children and thus preserve his beauty. Sonnet 2. This time I'm going to have to admit I haven't the faintest idea what he is getting at." Summary. The whole point of Sonnet 2 is to talk the young man it's addressing into having a kid. Sonnet 2 opens with a metaphor that compares the way time wears away a person's face to the way an army attacks a castle. This helps create bonds and texture within lines. These papers were written primarily by students and provide critical analysis of various sonnets by William Shakespeare. This brings added interest and challenge for the reader. Sonnet 2 continues the argument and plea from Sonnet 1, this time through the imagery of military, winter, and commerce. Below is Sonnet 2, and a few words of summary and analysis. Poetic Techniques in Sonnet 2. Tatter'd Weed: Having ragged garments Thriftless: Careless in handeling money; wasteful, or Below is Sonnet 2, and a few words of summary and analysis Shakespeare's Sonnet 2 is the second procreation sonnet. Summary. Sonnet 2 continues the theme begun in Sonnet 1, which is that the subject, the fair youth or young man to whom many of the sonnets are addressed, should have children to pass on his beauty. 12. The Shakespeare sonnet that begins ‘When forty winters shall besiege thy brow’ is sonnet 2 of 154, and the second in a series of ‘Procreation Sonnets’. IV. Time again is the great enemy, besieging the youth's brow, digging trenches — wrinkles — in his face, and ravaging his good looks. Interestingly, the speaker in the sonnet, because there is no mention of male or female, could be a man speaking to a man for example, or a woman to a woman, or man to woman, or older woman to younger man and vice versa. These papers were written primarily by students and provide critical analysis of various sonnets by William Shakespeare. Sonnet 2 continues the argument and plea from Sonnet 1, this time through the imagery of military, winter, and commerce. Analysis and Literary Devices of Shakespeare's Sonnet 2 Analysis . Analysis This is Sonnet II of Donne’s “Holy Sonnets”. Andrew has a keen interest in all aspects of poetry and writes extensively on the subject. Shakespeare’s Sonnets Sonnet 127. Sonnet 2 Analysis The sonnets by Shakespeare convince a young, handsome friend of Shakespeare’s to have children to forever keep his beauty alive. This sonnet has a rhyme scheme of ababcdcdefefgg with all but one of the rhymes being full: Many online sites glibly state that all of Shakespeare's sonnets are written in iambic pentameter and, whilst it is true that most lines in the sonnets are dominated by the iambic foot, not all lines are in pure iambic pentameter, far from it. Having children is the only solution and the tone is persuasive and perhaps a little cruel. Sonnet 2 maakt deel uit van de sonnetten van Shakespeare die voor de eerste keer in 1609 werden gepubliceerd. The structure of the sonnet is 4-4-4-2, although there is a change of emphasis and tone after the 8th line which means that the sonnet has a distinguishable octave and sestet. Again drawing on business imagery, the poet acknowledges that all he seeks is for the young man to have a child, who would immortalize the youth's beauty. An in-depth analysis of William Shakespeare's second Sonnet Shakespeare uses old in this sense in Macbeth: If a man were a porter of hell-gate, he should have old turning the key. To refrain from marriage makes the youth guilty of narcissism and of cruelty to future generations. The third quatrain answers the rhetorical question posed in the second, rather cheekily putting the words into the mouth of the subject, imagining a scene whereby the subject's future child appears to tie up loose ends and justify him in his old age. This is why many scholars doubt the autobiographical argument for the sonnets. This theme was quite common in Shakespeare's time, when average life expectancy for some could be as low as thirty five years. Sidney (so far) is not so difficult. Other lines with metrical variation include: To say / within / thine own / deep-sunk / en eyes (3 iambs + spondee + iamb), Were an / all-eat / ing shame / and thrift / less praise.